1. Practical Books 2 items
    These books are good for supporting your use of EnCase
    1. The little handbook of windows forensics - Andrea Fortuna 2018

      Book 

  2. Week by Week Directed Reading 0 items
  3. Reading 1 - read this before lecture 2 (The Industry) 6 items
    Think about how all of this information links up together. There are various people/organisations that are suggesting that accreditation and standardisation is important. What other organisations within the UK are trying to get involved? What impact have they had? Does the British Computer Society (BCS) have a role to play? Are the BCS important in terms of forensic computing? Post links for information you have found, and discuss your ideas on the eLearn discussion group.
    1. Digital evidence and computer crime: forensic science, computers and the Internet - Eoghan Casey, dawsonera 2011 (electronic resource)

      Book Core Read chapter 1: Foundations of Digital Forensics.

    2. Forensic Science Regulator - GOV.UK

      Webpage Core Generally read about what they do

    3. Digital forensics specialist group: minutes 2012

      Webpage Core Generally read about the digital forensic group

    4. The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences

      Website Further Generally read about who they are.

    5. Component Standards - The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences

      Webpage Further On the resulting webpage scroll down to the Digital Forensics section

  4. Reading 2 - read this before lecture 3 (Investigator Law 1) 7 items
    1. Human Rights Act 1998

      Webpage Core Concentrate on the articles identified within Schedule 1. Reading the Act itself is unlikely to gain you much benefit. Articles 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 should be of particular interest.

    2. Computer Misuse Act 1990

      Webpage Core We have covered the CMA before, so this should be a familiarisation

    3. Clive Goodman sentenced to four months | Media | The Guardian

      Webpage Core This is an example of where a “digital investigator” (of sorts) has broken the law.

    4. Policing, ethics and human rights - Peter Neyroud, Alan Beckley 2001

      Book Further This book is not directly related to Forensic Computing, however many of the laws and discussions are applicable to forensic computing. Page 54-70. [Also available as an Electronic Resource]

    5. Policing, ethics and human rights - Peter Neyroud, Alan Beckley, dawsonera 2001 (electronic resource)

      Book Further This book is not directly related to Forensic Computing, however many of the laws and discussions are applicable to forensic computing Pages 54-70.

    6. DNA dataveillance: protecting the innocent? - Anna Vartapetiance SalmasiGillam, Lee 2010

      Article Further

    7. Respect for your private and family life | Equality and Human Rights Commission

      Webpage Further This is written from the (potential) “victim” point of view, but is useful

  5. Reading 3 - read this before lecture 4 (Investigator Law 2) 6 items
    For off campus access students may need to search for the cases using the links to Lexis Library (or Westlaw) databases provided below. Follow the database webpage log in instructions.
  6. UCLan Library - Links to Lexis Library and Westlaw 2 items
  7. Reading 4 - read this before lecture 5 (Evidence and Admissibility) 6 items
    1. Information Commisioners Office 2015

      Website Core Find out what the information commissioner is responsible for, search for documents that may be relevant to an investigator

    2. Employment Practices Code - Information Commissioners Office 2015

      Webpage Further On the resulting webpage scroll down to the Employment Practices Code link

  8. Reading 5 - to be completed by week 6 (expert witness) 4 items
    1. Interpol's forensic science review - Niamh Nic Daéid, Max M. Houck 2010

      Book  Chapter 9; look at some of the references at the end.

    2. In the library there are several print copes of books that fall under the category "Law of Evidence".

      These are located at 347.06 on the first floor. 

      Select and read one of the books (they are generally available on short loan) and find out information on the following topics:

      • Relevance and Admissibility
      • Disclosure and Immunity
      • Legal Professional Privilege
      • Burden and Standard of Proof
      • Forms of Proof
      • Hearsay

       This is potentially a lot of reading that may take up to 8 hours to complete.

  9. Reading 6 - read this before lecture 8 (Integrated Digital Investigation Process) 2 items
  10. Reading 7 - read this before lecture 9 (Live Investigation & Triage) 1 item
    Spend about 2 hours reading around the subject of "What is a live investigation?" and "Why do we perform live investigations". Look at the reference list at the end of this article as a starting point. There will be a discussion about live investigations and specifically the model put forward in this article.
    1. Computer Forensics Field Triage Process Model - Marcus K. Rogers 2006

      Article Core On the resulting webpage click on the link to the pdf - upper right hand side of the window

  11. Reading 8 - read this before lecture 15 (Reconstruction) 1 item
    1. Digital evidence and computer crime: forensic science, computers and the Internet - Eoghan Casey 2011 (electronic resource)

      Book Core Read chapter 8 - about reconstruction of digital evidence / crime scenes.